News: The best PS Square Enix games to be re-released

UHVP_01.jpgVia Dengeki Online we learn that the Ultimate Hits series from Square Enix will include the best PlayStation titles these companies made in their separate histories. Games such as Seiken Densetsu: Legend of Mana, Vagrant Story, FF Tactics, Sa-Ga Frontier 2 and Valkyrie Profile will be relaunched at the reduced price of 1,575 yen this July. Now the only question is why isn’t Star Ocean – the Second Story there? Are they planning a PSP port or something?

News: Eiyuu Densetsu VI on PSP

EDVI_01.jpgThanks to Famitsu we know that Falcom’s next game for a non-PC system (after Gurumin, which we mentioned here) will be Eiyuu Densetsu VI ~Sora no Kiseki~. It’s the game’s first port and the target machine is PSP. Titled ‘Eiyuu Densetsu VI ~Sora no Kiseki~ FC [First Chapter]’, it leaves apart its recent sequel and will get a release on September 28th. Quite disappointing to see Falcom’s comeback to the ‘console scene.’ It’s been more than a decade and they chose a handheld. Oh well.

News: Tenshou Gakuen Gekkouroku

gekkouroku_01.jpgTenshou Gakuen Gensouroku (PS2, 2004) was Asmik’s spiritual successor to its Tokyo Majin Gakuen for the PS, a series of adventure games with Final Fantasy Tactics-based battles and a Megami Ibunroku Persona-inspired scenario which, was widely overlooked by Western aficionados. It was recently announced that it’d get a sequel titled ‘Tenshou Gakuen Gekkouroku’, and Asmik has released an official site for it today. Like its predecessor, the game will be fully hand-drawn and hi-res-presented, so just for that, it deserves a mention here, doesn’t it?

News: Magical Vacation – Itsutsu no Hoshi ga Narabu Toki

MV2_01.jpgThis isn’t really new, since we have already mentioned this game’s development – the sequel to Brownie Brown’s Magical Vacation for the GBA. This time it’s a DS game which will make you use the stylus more than you’ll likely want to do. Nintendo Dream has prominently covered the game in its latest issue letting us know that it will be available on Jue 22nd, also showing splendid art and screens which will presumably be added to the game’s official site in the coming days.

News: A truly Brave Story

bravestory.jpgOne of author Miyuki Minabe’s literary works, called Brave Story, is getting the anime feature treatment (courtesy of Gonzo). The trailers for the film that have been released thus far look positively lush.

Unsurprisingly, both a PS2 and PSP game have been announced (courtesy of SCEJ). Visually the PS2 title looks a lot like Wind Waker, and plays as an action RPG – but the PSP version, a traditional RPG, more closely resembles Valkyrie Profile Silmera in its dreamy visual quality.
<Brandon’s note: Not to be confused with Brave Prove. Not that anyone would! Very odd that they’ve made the PSP game much more visually complex than the PS2 one. But they can do what they want!>
<tim’s note: the PSP game is made by Game Republic! it’s executive-produced by yoshiki okamoto! odds are it’s going to be better than the PS2 game, which is weird.>

Not much to do with anything: “We has a several meaning”

all you need is wii; give wii a chance; say wii want a revolution; wii is over; why don't wii do it in the road The darkest corners of the internet are discussing “Wii” fervently. “Wii” is an event that comes only once a season: The Biggest Day In Internet History.

On that second thread, you can read an amusing post that points out how “Wii” is only the second-ever monosyllabic game-console name in history. (Can you remember the first? Answer is behind the link.) Also, my good friend and yours John Hummel chimes in with an enlightened post.

What do I think, personally? Well, I guess it doesn’t matter what the thing is called. (I’d personally have called it the “Mii,” though I guess that’s just me.) The games will probably be fun?

It could have been worse — they could have called the system “Driv3r”!!

It does remind me of something, however. During my first year of college, a music theory professor in the Indiana University Music School found a sheet of paper half crumpled outside a dustbin. It was an essay entitled “WE,” apparently written by a foreign exchange student. It became a “meme” (“weme”?) on campus, and just a short search on the phrase “We has a several meaning” yielded this page, which displays that the joke kept going years after I forgot about it. I recommend everyone read it, and then compare it to Nintendo’s introductory message on the Wii website. Notice the similarity in themes. “We has a several meaning,” compared to “Introducing Wii . . . as in ‘We.'”

This is fate. A linguistics professor at IU analyzed “We” and determined it was written by a Japanese person. Might this young man have sharpened his English, grown up and moved back to Kyoto? Mysteries abound as E3 approaches.

Tragedy: The Revolution is called the fucking “wii”

wii.jpgIn (perhaps?) an effort to make the console ‘accessible’, The Revolution has been redubbed the wii. While The Revolution indicated change in bold, daring strokes, ‘wii’ indicates, well…I don’t know. Having fun? Community? It is pronounced “we,” after all. It’s going to be a bit hard to call it that though. Dreamcast was enough of a stretch. And I guess we all got used to PlayStation. But wii? How will you talk about it? “let’s wii!” Perhaps when purchasing one you can say “hey, I’m going to go take a wii. Want to come? wii can go together!”

I’m wondering if they focus tested this name. I mean…they must have! But hey. Nintendo is crazy, and they seem to be on the right track, so maybe this whole ridiculous naming thing will really take off. And maybe when their next console comes out, they’ll call it the wwii. Well. At least it plays PC Engine games. Thanks to insufferable whiner Jess “I love to get credit for my work” Ragan (beware of popups) for the image. P.S. Kohler loves Nintendo!

Best comment I’ve seen so far (via somethingawful forums) – Nintendo is so intent on becoming number one, that they named their console after it. of course…it doesn’t really matter what it’s called, does it?

Link: ‘Defense’ of the ‘Silent Hill’ ‘movie’

you know, the abbreviation for 'silent hill' is 'SH,' as in 'SHHHHHHHH' Next-Gen.biz runs this “Defense” of the “Silent Hill” movie making the rounds at theaters all over the United States of America. Apparently critics are slamming it as “another sucky videogame movie adaptation,” and this is both true and not true, because it seems the movie is actually quite competently made, and all of its awkwardnesses are on purpose. This raises wonderful questions about how (and why) we should judge the quality of a thing if it’s being bad on purpose.

From the article:

Silent Hill’s real strength comes with how it wears its videogame roots on its sleeve. The first hour and a half or so of the movie almost perfectly nails the atmosphere, pacing, and structure of the first game in the series. Watching that portion of the movie is as close as one can get to playing the games without actually playing them. That this is achieved within the constraints of Hollywood movie-making is remarkable; the problem is that while the film succeeds as an adaptation, it fails as cinema.

I think that says it all right there. The article goes on to talk about how being a “minor mainstream success” might be in the best interests of people wanting a “validation,” in cinema, of videogames’ value as media. Maybe so. Personally, though, if you ask me, videogames are videogames, and movies are movies. A good videogame, then, is a good videogame, and a good movie is a good movie. I’ll end this with a

PROTIP: TO MAKE GOOD MOVIE ON VIDEOGAMES, DON’T

News: Senjou no Kizuna location test

kizuna_cockpit.jpgThe rather immense Kidou Senshi Gundam: Senjou no Kizuna arcade game will be on location test at Plabo (Nakano) from April 29th until May 7th. Unlike the recent announcement of an Xbox 360 Gundam game which is just a Battlefield clone, Kizuna is a very interesting arcade game if only for the fact it boasts a proper 180 degree view cockpit (with control sticks and foot pedals to boot). It’s also based around the same technology as the O.R.B.S. cabinet that was developed a while back (a Starblade sequel was planned for it but it got canned, unfortunately).

Based around two teams of eight mobile suits per side, Kizuna will be networked across arcades in Japan. This is mostly due to the prohibitively expensive price tag for each machine and that arcades supposedly won’t be able to afford more than one. Admittedly, there is only one mobile suit from that era of the Universal Century timeline with a linear seat-esque cockpit but it really doesn’t matter when you consider that you will be encased by a screen that is actually bigger than you are.

News: Playable insects in ACE2

rean1.jpgYoshiyuki Tomino’s latest magnum animated opus, The Wings of Rean, is doing quite nicely in Japan. Being the first ONA (Original Net Animation) anime series, episodes are initially released online and then on DVD. The second episode of a scheduled six was released only a few days ago. Rean appears to be a sequel to the novels of the same name from the mid-80’s, though with added mecha, and is also based in the same locale as Aura Battler Dunbine; the mythical world of Byston Well.

The interesting gaming related trinket is that both the Nanajin and Oukao aura battlers (the mecha of choice for the population of Byston Well) were made as playable units in the recent Another Century’s Episode 2, before the episodes were released that featured them. Thankfully you can also team up with the Dunbine aura battlers as well, in true Super Robot Taisen style.

The design work for these new aura battlers was helmed by Takumi Sakura and Tamotsu Shinohara, of which the latter worked extensively on Kamen Rider 555 (so the insect orientated design isn’t a new thing).